QUESTIONS ABOUT KOMBUCHA

Frequently Asked Questions

What is kombucha?

Kombucha is fermented tea, and it naturally contains probiotics and healthy organic acids. It has been consumed for thousands of years across countless cultures as a beverage that promotes health, and has recently been on a major rise in the US. A little tart and a little sweet, with just the right amount of bubbles, kombucha is a delicious natural treat!

How does one make kombucha?

Kombucha is made using 4 ingredients: water, tea, sugar, and a SCOBY. A SCOBY (stands for Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast) is the culture that ends up turning sweet tea into kombucha, and it’s similar to what is used for fermenting real yogurt, kefir, and sourdough.

The 4 ingredients go into primary and secondary fermentation, wherein the friendly probiotics eat the sugars and turn them into bubbles and healthy organic acids.

Kombucha tastes great with all kinds of flavors, so get creative in what you want to add and when you want to add it–there are no rules! In the end, you get an effervescent, slightly sweet, and tart beverage that is extremely refreshing and makes you feel good.

Of course, like with anything else, the quality of ingredients and vessel you use will highly impact the end flavor and quality, so be sure to use glass and only use the best ingredients to brew and flavor.

What is a kombucha scoby?

A SCOBY (Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast) is the culture used to turn sweet tea into kombucha. It’s a cellulose matrix of friendly bacteria, yeasts, and enzymes (probiotics) that will eat the sugar in sweet tea and in exchange make bubbles and healthy organic acids. It may look weird, but it’s totally natural–and it’s similar to what is used to make many fermented foods, like real yogurt, kefir, and sourdough bread!

What are the benefits of kombucha?

Kombucha is a food, not a drug or a supplement. So it’s best to look at kombucha like you look at a bag of carrots–delicious, natural, and make you feel good. Of course, kombucha, like all fermented foods, naturally contain probiotics and healthy organic acids–and the science is strong around their benefit to our digestion and our bodies. In the end, try it and see how it makes YOU feel. That’s your best indication for what it’s benefit will be, beyond great taste ????

What is your kombucha recipe?

We follow the ancient old-school recipe for kombucha. 1 cup of sugar per gallon of black/green tea, plus a splash of starter (aged kombucha) and a SCOBY. We let the kombucha ferment in primary and secondary fermentation naturally, and wait until SHE’S ready before we bottle and sell.

We flavor ONLY with the best ingredients, like cold-pressed juice from organic produce that we buy straight from the local farms, and ferment in super small 2.5 gallon glass jars to prevent plastic and metal leaching.

Basically, we make it the way you’d make it at home—just a lot of it. No one in the commercial space makes it quite like us, and we’re proud to be the most real kombucha on the market (we might be biased here, but we think that’s why we’re the best tasting too!)

What are the ingredients of Kombucha?

Kombucha is made using 4 ingredients: water, tea, sugar, and a SCOBY.

A SCOBY (stands for Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast) is the culture that ends up turning sweet tea into kombucha, and it’s similar to what is used for fermenting real yogurt, kefir, and sourdough.

Any kinds of flavors can be added to kombucha at any part of the process. Of course, like with anything else, the quality of ingredients and vessel you use will highly impact the end flavor and quality, so be sure to use glass and only use the best ingredients to brew and flavor.

Is kombucha tea?

Kombucha is as much like tea as apple cider vinegar is apple juice…so NO, it’s not really thought of as a tea. It’s a fermented tea, and it tastes quite a bit different than tea. It’s cold, bubbly, and slightly tart/sweet. Equally delicious ????

Is it easy to make your own kombucha?

It IS easy to make kombucha, and we highly recommend it! You can find the recipe online, and here are a few tips: get the highest quality SCOBY you can find to start (we recommend kombuchakamp.com), use the best ingredients and highest quality flavors for your brew, and ferment in glass to prevent plastic and metal leaching. Also, be patient–it can take some time to get good at brewing–keep at it and you’ll get there!

What kind of ginger do you use in your Kombucha?

We cold-press ALL our ginger in house, and we’re proud of this because it is NOT an easy feat. Right now, we go through tons and tons of ginger to flavor all our ginger-lemon kombucha, and it’s totally unprocessed from the fruit to the press to the bottle. It’s 100% organic, non-gmo certified, and totally raw.

How often should I drink Kombucha?

Kombucha is a food, not a drug or a supplement. So it’s best to look at kombucha like you look at a bag of carrots–delicious, natural, and makes you feel good. When you look at it like that, you’ll realize there is no “right” amount or “wrong” amount to drink. Drink as much as makes you feel good ???? Some like a ½ bottle, some like a full bottle–some like 4 bottles! There is no rule here, as it’s a natural food.

I have something in my Kombucha, yuck!? (SCOBY in drink)

Kombucha is a fermented food, and in fermentation the cultures of probiotics like to form a cellulose matrix to live in (called a SCOBY). At Health-Ade, we try hard to filter that out before we bottle it, but sometimes the cultures can make it through. This is a totally natural part of the brew, and not indicative of anything foul or bad.

Many here consider it a “bonus” because it’s arguably a big dose of the good stuff. At the same time, if you don’t like it, just don’t drink that part. It’s like the “mother” in apple cider vinegar.

Does Kombucha have Vinegar in it?

Real kombucha should not have any vinegar in it as an ingredient, although many mass-produced brands have opted to hasten their process by adding it as a filler. However, kombucha DOES end up having vinegar (acetic acid) and other types of acids (malic, tartaric, gluconic/glucoronic) in it because that’s what develops in fermentation: the SCOBY (the culture of probiotics in kombucha) eats the sugars and makes them healthy organic acids.